F.A.Q.

I’ve got a 5-page-long document, when will the translation be ready?

The average daily output normally ranges between 1,500 and 2,000 words. However, the effective figure can differ a lot from this depending on the kind of text that will be translated. For instance, technical texts very often require in-depth terminology research, which naturally takes time! The only way for you to know when your translation will be ready is to send me the document specifying any additional information or special needs for your project. I’ll analyse the text and then get back to you with a free quote based on the provided information.

I need this text translated into English/German, can you take care of it?

A professional translator translates from foreign languages into his native language. When translating into foreign languages, even the best trained translator might not get to the same high-quality result as his native colleagues. So the answer to the question is no. However, should you need an Italian to English or German translation, I will be happy to help you finding a suitable colleague who will take care of your request.

My document is still a draft, but I’m under deadline pressure, could you make a start?

“Tempting as it may be to get your translation project rolling as quickly as possible, having translators work from a draft-in-progress will almost always be more time-consuming – hence more expensive (and probably more frustrating) – than waiting for the final text to be ready. Worse yet: the more versions you have, the more likely it is that errors will creep into the final version.”

[Quoted from The Getting it Right Guide: A buyers guide to sourcing and using translation services (2014)]

My in-house secretary is bilingual and she takes care of every translation in our company. Why should I hire an external translator?
or many companies faced with foreign-language texts, the first stop is the bilingual colleague inside the company. While this may – sometimes – work for inbound translation, it is extremely risky for promotional texts (i.e., company’s website, brochures, newsletters…). If the translation is poor (in style, register, grammar…), it will turn against you providing bad publicity for your company. Moreover, perfect bilingualism is quite rare: even those who speak two or more languages since childhood are not always able to transfer meaning from one language to another, especially in written texts.

[Source: The Getting it Right Guide: A buyers guide to sourcing and using translation services (2014)]

What is liaison interpreting?

Liaison interpreting is one mode of interpretation where the interpreter enables fluid communication between two parties. It typically takes place during business encounters between people from different countries, i.e. during trade fairs, where companies meet their foreign clients or suppliers. In liaison interpreting communication takes place in a non-simultaneous triangle-like pattern.

But how much do your services cost?

The cost for a translation is given by the number of words of the original document. However, the final price can vary depending on a number of factors, i.e. file format, kind of text, possible additional services required, and so on. The only way for you to know how much you should budget for your translation is to get in touch with me and send me your document specifying any additional information or special needs for your project. I’ll then get back to you with a free quote based on the provided information.

“The Getting it Right Guide: A buyers guide to sourcing and using translation services” (2014) helped me putting together this list of frequently asked questions. The guide provides the low-down on planning and working on translation projects and can be downloaded from the website of the ITI, the Institute of Translation & Interpreting, following this link: The Getting it Right Guide.